Tag Archives: Holocaust Awareness

Our City’s Collective Responsibility


This week: a message from JCRC's Emily Reichman, Director of Service Initiatives (R), and Shira Burns, JCRC Communications Staff.

On Monday, in an auditorium full of high school students visiting the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Holocaust survivor Esther Starobin asked: “Is there anything specific you’re hoping to see here today?” Sherley Maximin’s hand shot up.

Sherley is this year’s first place winner of JCRC’s annual Israel Arbiter Essay Contest for high school students, and one of over 200 who submitted essays on themes related to the Holocaust. This Monday, she and three other student winners from schools across Greater Boston joined JCRC to spend the day at the museum in Washington, D.C.

In her essay, Sherley, who moved to Boston from Haiti two years ago, reflected on the life-changing encounter she had with local Holocaust survivors during a visit to the New England Holocaust Memorial last summer after it was vandalized by a student from her school. The students came together to let the Jewish community of Boston know that this student from their school did not represent them:

“That experience went beyond all the things that I could ever read in textbooks. I had such a meaningful conversation with Dr. Ornstein, a survivor. Nothing is comparable to listening to a survivor share their experience. I realized that there is much more to pay attention to. Way too often, we forget the causes of historical events like the Holocaust and I think we must commit to point to the signs when they arise. The lessons that one can learn from the history of the Holocaust are endless. This experience definitely strengthened my desire to learn more.”

Sherely (L) and a fellow Malden High School student at the NEHM.

This past week, days before Sherley’s visit to Washington, we marked the 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht. “The Night of Broken Glass” ushered in a time of unparalleled hatred and devastation that led to the loss of six million Jewish lives.

In 1938, we were isolated and alone. Today, the strength of our community is demonstrated through our relationships and our alliances, and through our neighbors’ determined refusal to remain silent in the face of hatred and bigotry.

And in Boston this Tuesday, under a heavy downpour, we gathered at the New England Holocaust Memorial (NEHM) to acknowledge a significant gift made to the Memorial by the Glaziers Union, part of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades District Council 35. The Glaziers have been involved in the Memorial from the beginning, building and installing the original Memorial in 1995, made up of six iconic glass towers with 132 glass panels.

After the Memorial was vandalized last year, the union felt compelled to stand with the Jewish community and to uphold the integrity of this space that is sacred to so many. “It is our moral obligation to stand up and to speak up,” said Wayne Murphy, Director of Government and Public Affairs for the union. In his remarks, Murphy also noted that his union responded to last year’s vandalism by stepping in to repair the damage, offering to perform the work pro bono.

We were also joined by Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, who has been steadfast in his commitment to the Jewish community, showing up at event after event as we find ourselves under assault. He reflected on the “acts of anti-Semitism happening all over our country,” including the Pittsburgh synagogue massacre of October 27, in which 11 Jewish worshippers were murdered.

At JCRC we don’t take those relationships and alliances, nor the lessons of the Holocaust, for granted. That is why we provide education and engagement, connected with the Memorial, in Boston’s broader civic space beyond the Jewish community.

Displayed on the wall of the United States Holocaust Museum is a quote from Elie Wiesel’s remarks at the Dedication Ceremonies for the Museum on April 22, 1993: “This museum is not an answer. It is a question.” The museum, and the Holocaust itself, is not finite, but rather a living, breathing history that informs our collective responsibility. An enduring communal memory of the Holocaust is crucial.

And what was Sherley Maximin’s answer to that question on Monday about her hopes for the day?

“I’m hoping to see aspects of the exhibit that inspire me to recommit to resilience and hope.”

We hope that we met Sherley’s hopes this week. And her hopes were met for us as well – when we saw Sherley and her high school community, and the Glaziers Union, stand up in the face of acts of hatred this past year. Their actions, and the actions of so many others, remind us of what is good in our city. They inspire us to recommit, with resilience and hope, to ensuring that future generations of Bostonians will do so for years to come.

Shabbat Shalom,

Emily & Shira

“How Could it have happened? When will it stop?”

Each year on the Sunday between Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur, Jews around the world visit the graves of their parents to honor their memories. For many Holocaust survivors and their families, there are no graves to visit. Instead, JCRC and our partners host a Yizkor Service for our community’s local survivors and their families, a program that includes survivor testimony.

When I heard the below testimony from child survivor Frieda Grayzel, I knew that her story of survival needed to be heard by a much broader audience – and that her impassioned pleas for action on behalf of today’s “undesirables” were critical to promote. It is my privilege to share it, with the permission of this remarkable woman.

Shabbat Shalom,

Jeremy

Greetings, dear fellow survivors, dear families and friends.

Shalom. 

My name is Frieda Grayzel, and I was born in Tomaszow, Poland in 1934.

I stand before you, a child survivor, at this very solemn Yizkor Service for the murdered 6 million of our families, friends, teachers, and unborn generations of fellow Jews whom we continue to mourn.

I come from Central Poland, from a large, close family long settled there. I was the cherished, beloved, cute little girl in a family of mostly boisterous boy cousins. My hair curled like Shirley Temple’s, my dresses lovingly made by my mother, and my elegant coats by my father, a tailor trained in Poland and Paris.

May 1939 - My fifth birthday party. Attended by aunts, uncles, cousins and family friends singing good wishes to me. Among my many gifts was a large red ball with big white dots and a carrying net, popular in Europe then, and a picture book of classical Greek and Roman mythology.

September 1, 1939 - Germany invades Poland. We flee to relatives in Warsaw. My sister Dorka is born on September 7th amidst exploding bombs. We are bombed day and night, trapped without food, running water, or electricity, spending many hours in damp, dark cellars turned into bomb shelters. Warsaw resists the Germans for 27 days.

October 1939 - We return home. New laws in quick succession quickly strip our civil and human rights, enforced by random shootings, humiliations, and brutality. 

Spring 1940 - We are forced to move into a walled ghetto in the worst part of town, many families crammed into each apartment. The ghetto population grows to 15,000 as the surrounding countryside is cleared of Jews. Hunger, cold, no electricity, no heat. Conditions worsen daily. Some lucky people get above starvation rations when they are employed in workshops making goods needed by the German Reich - tailors, shoemakers, carpenters, etc. My father becomes one of them.  

All of our valuables are confiscated, many people shot for trying to hide their jewelry, furs, money, household silver. The lies accumulate: the “Red Cross action”, the “Palestine action”, and on... working on peoples’ hopes that they can escape if only they prove that they have relatives elsewhere.  They are sent to their deaths. 

October 30 and November 2, 1942: The Aussiedlung ‘evacuation’: Aussiedlung: 95% of the ghetto told they will be sent to labor camps. A new lie calculated to minimize resistance. My grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, friends are all sent to Treblinka, the extermination camp, and murdered. The rest of us who have a close family member working in a workshop remain in the ghetto and are put to work emptying the apartments of those sent to Treblinka. In a large warehouse, we sort and clean all the possessions to be sent to Germany. My mother and I work sorting through the bed linens and bundling them. 

April 1943 – We are crammed into cattle cars, standing room only. Interminable trip, no air, no water, a cooking pot for a toilet. We arrive at Blizyn labor camp which also allows random killings and beatings for the smallest infraction. Separate camps for men and women, barracks with one board thick walls. 

November 1943 - My little sister Dorka, four years old, is ripped from my mother’s arms. My mother fights to go with her and is savagely beaten. All the children are sent to a nearby forest and shot.

December 1943 - My father and uncle are arrested, stripped of their shoes and kept in a wire enclosure on snowy, frozen ground. My mother scours the camp, manages to get a pair of wooden clogs and throws them over the wire fence to my father. She is beaten savagely with a board from a wooden fence, her ribs broken. That winter, a typhus epidemic sweeps through the camp and almost everyone comes down with raging fevers and hallucinations, no medical care. The “hospital” barrack is so full that I lie on the floor in the hallway. I survive. Soon I come down with malnutrition sores all over. 

July 1944 - We are crammed into cattle cars, an even longer journey. Blinded by light as the doors are slid loudly open, we are pushed, yells of ‘schnell, schnell, faster, faster’- to jump onto the platform many feet below the cattle car floor, surrounded by wildly barking dogs. We have arrived in Auschwitz- Birkenau. Men and women separate, we are told to strip. Many of us have our heads shaved roughly. We get through the showers, alive - water this time. We go through long lines under harsh flood lights to be tattooed with numbers - no more names. In Birkenau, camp B2B, overcrowded triple tier wooden board bunks, starvation rations. I am terrified as my mother risks her life over and over to procure us a bit of extra food. Hangings, shootings, and horrible punishments are all around us. Suicides by electric wire fences. We become used to the stench of the crematorium smoke. 

October 1944 - Our camp is herded to the FKL women’s camp in Auschwitz. We go through a selection by the infamous, white gloved Dr. Mengele. I am sent to the left, my mother refuses to go to the right- to the right go young women capable of work. She is beaten again, but then allowed to join me. As is my cousin Rena and her mother Hinda. Our little group – children and some older women, stand for hours in front of an iron and wood door - the gas chamber. As darkness falls, we are told to dress and walked to a fenced-in brick barrack, holding place for the gas chamber and ovens. We learned later that a small group of women prisoners, over a long period of time, had smuggled in tiny amounts of explosives from a munitions factory and exploded the crematorium– The Sonderkommando Revolt.

An SS woman approaches my mother the next day. She asks if my mother wants to save me and Rena.  Our mothers consult and say yes - they know what our fate will otherwise be. We are taken to the Twins barrack, enclosed by a wire fence. We were close in age. Dr. Mengele performs horrible, heartless experiments on twins. He himself was a twin. Daily some are taken away and returned – or sometimes not – in pain, with bandages, but they never talk. 

The winter of 1944 closed in, days darkened; the twins’ barracks is transferred to the “gypsy camp” after its occupants were gassed and cremated. After a while my mother found me and instructed me on what symptoms to complain of so I would be sent to a hospital barrack. Somehow they managed to get me and Rena transferred. Evacuations, the death marches, towards the West started. Rena and I were too weak to walk, so the four of us hid under the planks of an empty barrack, on the frozen ground.  When the Germans came through to look for any strays, they did not find us.  

January 27, 1945 - The Russian liberating soldiers arrived. January 27th became my second birthday, my re-birth-day.  

July 1945 - My father and uncle Nathan return from six concentration camps after hitchhiking from camp Ebensee in Austria. Rena’s eight-year-old brother Romek was killed in Auschwitz, her father shot a few days before liberation.  We were alive:  we were homeless and stateless. We ended up in Displaced Persons camps in West Germany. After four years of waiting our visas’ turn came and we arrive in the United States in 1949. Our readjustments begin again.

So – how could all this have happened?  Six million of our people and so many others tortured and murdered, one-and-a half million children murdered? 

How could it have happened? It tears my heart to remember, to talk about it – how could it have happened?

Is it when leaders and governments nurture lies and propaganda designed to denigrate and dehumanize some peoples? Is it when it calls people undesirables, as we were, when all borders were closed to us? Is it when people seeking asylum from dire conditions are called murderers and rapists? When it uses children’s separation from their parents heartlessly, as a means to control the borders? Do they not realize or care that the consequences of these actions never go away? For they never go away. 

I will never forget my four-year-old sister Dorka ripped from my mother’s arms, sent to her death in some nearby forest.  The echoes of the 1930‘s in our current situation here are too frightful...

Most of us, survivors, have built good and successful lives and families. We needed both strength and chance to survive. But we live with our experiences always, and so do the families we created. It is inevitable. 

So when will it stop? Will good people with open hearts be strong enough to stop it?  The deceptions, the lies, the heartless policies, the propaganda?  Let us hope so.

JCRC’s Statement on the Death of Elie Wiesel

We mourn the loss of renowned Holocaust survivor, accomplished author, and Nobel laureate, Elie Wiesel, z”l. Our community and communities across the globe have lost a champion human rights activist and a moral compass, consistently speaking out against violence, repression, and racism. As news of hate and terror comes all too often, we must remember Wiesel’s words - there may be times when we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest - and we must act in his stead to make the world a more just and safe place, with a shared sense of humanity and humility. His memory will forever be a blessing.

Boston Globe: ‘Mein Kampf’ publisher will support Holocaust survivors

As a result of community advocacy and various negotiations, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt has dramatically changed course from their original plans to distribute Mein Kampf proceeds to various Boston-area organizations. The proceeds from the sale of the English translation of Mein Kampf will now be used over a multi-year period to provide direct care to Survivors of the Holocaust though a grant to JCRC partner agency Jewish Family & Children's Service of Greater Boston.

While this is not the grant for Holocaust education that earlier proceeds had been used for (and what we advocated for in recent months) it is absolutely an appropriate role for the use of profits from the sale of the blueprint for the Shoah - to care directly for the Survivors.

Read the full story on the Boston Globe website.

The Courage to Tell and Retell

This week we commemorated Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. Though the event was widely covered in the local press, not included in that coverage was a private moment I’d like to share with you; one that’s stayed with me all week.

After the public ceremony at Faneuil Hall and the New England Holocaust Memorial, our keynote speaker, David Eisenhower, historian and grandson of General Dwight Eisenhower, joined a small lunch to thank some of the donors and volunteers who made our program possible. He was asked a question about how he came to dedicate his professional life to writing about and teaching the history of World War II.

One moment in Eisenhower’s response jumped out: David told us that, growing up, his grandfather and his father John– who also served in the war –never talked about the war once they returned from the front. What they did talk about, copiously, was the Civil War. David had fond memories of rich weekly discussions with his father and grandfather, as they made their way through the classic works about that time period. He came to understand that the older men chose to share their passion for military history with him through a “proxy war” since they were not yet ready to relive their own recent painful experience in World War II. 

I was deeply intrigued by this idea, not just in the moment of Yom HaShoah, but also in the wake of our recent Passover experience.

The Jewish people tell and retell our ancient story of trauma and slavery in – and eventual liberation from – Egypt every year, not only with ease but with a sense of celebration. Yet for so many of us it is far harder to share the traumas that we experience personally, and that are still fresh and tender in our memory.
 
Many survivors were unable to talk about what happened to them for many years, if ever. Eisenhower’s story is yet one more reminder of the courage that it has taken for every single survivor of the Shoah to find a way to tell his or her own story, as Max Michelson did for us this past Sunday, and to bear witness to unimaginable horror. The Haggadah reminds us of the obligation of each generation b'chol dor vador to tell and retell the story of our subjugation and eventual liberation.bAnd we do so, not simply to relive the trauma but to lend it meaning, reaffirming our commitment to cherish freedom and to fight oppression. Together may we transform our trauma and become a living memory to all who have perished, as we honor their legacy for generations to come.

Shabbat Shalom,
Jeremy

JCRC of Greater Boston Announces Winners of 9th Annual Holocaust Essay Contest

(BOSTON) – The Jewish Community Relations Council (JCRC) of Greater Boston has announced the winners of the 9th annual Israel Arbeiter Holocaust Essay Contest.

The theme for this year’s contest was Liberation: From Darkness to Light. Students from Greater Boston in grades 6 -12 were invited to write a 400–800 word essay reflecting on the following quote from Elie Wiesel, Nobel Peace laureate and holocaust survivor:

“I swore never to be silent whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation. We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.”

The winners of the 2015 Israel Arbeiter Holocaust Essay Contest:

Upper Division

1st place
Donaldo Jean-Baptiste, Malden High School, 12th grade

2nd place
Kaitlyn Rabinovitz, Whitman-Hanson Regional High School, 11th grade

3rd place
Nicholas Zink, German International School of Boston, 9th grade

 

Lower Division

1st place
Madison Lomax, Tenney Grammar School, 8th grade, Methuen

2nd place
Geryes Geha, Timony Grammar School, 6th grade, Methuen

3rd place
Ashley Sullivan, Timony Grammar School, 6th grade, Methuen

Winners were recognized at LIBERATION: FROM DARKNESS TO LIGHT, a community commemoration of Yom HaShoah, on Sunday, April 12th, at Faneuil Hall in Boston. The featured speaker was author and historian David Eisenhower, grandson of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, the 5-star general who served as Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in Europe during World War II.

All winners will receive a trip to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on Veteran’s Day, Wednesday, November 11, 2015. The first and second place winners in the Upper Division will also be awarded a $1,000 scholarship to participate in the spring 2016 teen heritage March of the Living (MOTL) trip. The goal for MOTL (motl.org) is for young people to learn the lessons of the Holocaust and to become leaders vowing "Never Again.” The MOTL scholarships are made possible due to the generosity of the Kempner Family Foundation.

The 9th Annual Israel Arbeiter Holocaust Essay Contest is named for 89 year-old Holocaust survivor Israel ‘Izzy’ Arbeiter of Newton, a lifelong rights activist who lost many family members in the Holocaust. Izzy is a past president of the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors of Greater Boston.

LIBERATION: FROM DARKNESS TO LIGHT, the community commemoration of Yom HaShoah on April 12 was presented by the Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Boston (JCRC), with support from Combined Jewish Philanthropies, Facing History and Ourselves, the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors of Greater Boston, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and many generous donors.

JCRC of Greater Boston to Present Community Holocaust Commemoration of Yom HaShoah

David Eisenhower, Historian and Grandson of President Dwight Eisenhower, Will Deliver Keynote

(BOSTON) – To honor local survivors of the Holocaust and to pay tribute to those who perished, the Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Boston (JCRC) and its partners will present LIBERATION: FROM DARKNESS TO LIGHT, a community commemoration of Yom HaShoah, on Sunday, April 12th, 10:30 A.M. at Faneuil Hall in Boston.

This year’s event marks the 20th anniversary of the dedication of the New England Holocaust Memorial and the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Nazi concentration camps.

The keynote speaker, David Eisenhower, is a noted historian and the Director of the Institute for Public Service at the Annenberg Public Policy Center. He is the grandson of U.S. General and President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

“David Eisenhower is not only a renowned scholar of the historical era encompassing the liberation, but is also a direct descendant of a person whose life and legacy is so interwoven with the fate of the Jewish people,” said Rick Mann, Co-Chair of this year’s event . “His appearance is a gift of immeasurable value to our entire community and particularly to the aging survivors who will be in attendance.”

Max Michelson, a native of Riga, Latvia, will speak during the ceremony of his personal story of survival during the Holocaust. He went through a number of concentration camps and was liberated in Germany in May, 1945. Mr. Michelson is also the author of City of Life, City of Death, Memories of Riga.

LIBERATION: FROM DARKNESS TO LIGHT is presented in partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors and Descendants of Greater Boston, Combined Jewish Philanthropies, Facing History and Ourselves, and Jewish Family & Children’s Services.

JCRC Congratulates Israel Arbeiter

Local Holocaust survivor and activist to join Presidential Delegation to Poland to commemorate liberation of Auschwitz.

izzy-crop

The Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Boston wishes to congratulate Israel “Izzy” Arbeiter for being chosen by President Obama to be part of a Presidential Delegation to Oświęcim, Poland to attend the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau on January 27, 2015.

For over 60 years, Izzy Arbeiter, an Auschwitz-Birkenau survivor, has dedicated his life to commemorating and educating others about the Holocaust. He has stood up and spoken for the rights of survivors demanding that the world must remember what has happened, to understand why it has happened, and to identify the seeds from which hate grows.

Izzy is one of the founders of the New England Holocaust Memorial and a driving force behind Holocaust education in New England.

We congratulate Izzy on this high honor and look forward to joining him for the re-dedication of the Israel Arbiter Gallery of Understanding at The Gann Academy in Waltham, MA on February 1.

JCRC of Greater Boston Announces 9th Annual Holocaust Essay Contest

Open to Grades 6-12; Honors Holocaust Survivor and Activist
Israel Arbeiter

(BOSTON) - The Jewish Community Relations Council (JCRC) of Greater Boston has announced that entries are being accepted for the 9th annual Israel Arbeiter Holocaust Essay Contest. Deadline for entries is February 23, 2015.

The theme for this year’s contest is Liberation: From Darkness to Light. Students in grades 6 -12 in Greater Boston are invited to write a 400–800 word essay, to be judged on originality, knowledge, style and depth.

Students are asked to reflect on the following quote from Elie Wiesel, Nobel Peace laureate and holocaust survivor:

“I swore never to be silent whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation. We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.”

Essays should address the following: Why do you think it is important not to be silent when humans endure suffering? Do you agree or disagree with Elie Wiesel that we must always take sides in this matter? Why or why not? Discuss a time in your life when you took a side, or you wish you had taken a side, when you witnessed an injustice.

Winners will receive a trip to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington D.C.

Contest entries should be sent to Ellen Kaye at *protected email*, or mail to JCRC, 126 High St, Boston, MA 02110, along with name, address, phone number, email, birthdate, school, and grade.

The essay contest is part of JCRC’s broader Holocaust Awareness initiative, which includes a Community Holocaust Commemoration of Yom HaShoah. This year’s commemoration will be held on Sunday, April 12 at Faneuil Hall in Boston.

The contest is being coordinated by the Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Boston, Combined Jewish Philanthropies, Facing History and Ourselves, the American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors and Descendants of Greater Boston, and many generous donors.

About Israel “Izzy” Arbeiter

Israel “Izzy” Arbeiter is a Holocaust survivor and lifelong rights activist who lost several family members including both of his parents in the Holocaust. For Izzy, the nightmares – and the struggle for justice - have continued for over 60 years. He has carried his message nationwide and internationally, raising funds for the National Holocaust Museum and the Boston Holocaust Memorial, testified against Nazi war criminals, and on behalf of victims’ families before Congressional committees. As a guest of the German Government, Izzy addressed members of Parliament and spoke at town meetings – often to Germans who had never met a Jew. His commitment to "tikkun olam" (healing the world) on many levels is legendary.

About Jewish Community Relations Council

JCRC defines and advances the values, interests and priorities of the organized Jewish community in greater Boston in the public square. Visit us at www.jcrcboston.org.