The Story of our Community of Communities

When JCRC is in the news, more often than not, it is about a public policy issue, our engagement with elected officials, or some other political process that is complex and at times even controversial. And, more often than not, when we’re in the national Jewish news, it is because of fraught processes we are engaged in about communal boundaries; who gets to sit at the table, and what politics are out of bounds. These are both accurate representations of aspects of JCRC. We are, after all, a coalition of organizations and individuals from across the ideological spectrum, coming together to identify and advance collective Jewish communal concerns in Greater Boston.  

These days it can often feel like too much of the public discourse is offered solely through the prism of politics. You know the headlines, that tend to sound something like: “Breaking News: The President stubbed his toe. What will this mean for the midterm elections?”  

Or, to put it another way, most people do not wake up in the morning thinking about how a traffic jam on the Pike will impact the next election (though some people I know do). They’re worrying instead about how it will impact their ability to be home with family for dinner.   

So, while politics is what we “do” on behalf of our community at JCRC much of the time, it isn’t who we are. Who we are is a community – an organized community – the Jewish community of Greater Boston. And we are a community of communities; the many – over 40 – organizations that are the members of our Council. And even these organizations are communities of communities; the many congregations that make up a denomination, the many clubs and groups that make up a JCC. And so on.  

I’m privileged to be exposed to all these communities during the course of my work. I get to experience their programs, honor their differences, and be inspired by their energy. I get to appreciate all the ways that each of them is doing interesting, important things that – together – make up the story of our community. 

I aspire to a Jewish community where all of us get to appreciate what I see every day in our members. And I’m excited that we at JCRC are rolling out a new Speakers Series to lift up these communities that make up the JCRC Council.  

Over the last year, I’ve been sitting down with many of our civic partners and public officials to discuss their work and JCRC’s partnership with them. Many of you have joined us for these – now almost weekly – conversations. And we’ll keep having them.  

Now, starting on December 21st, I invite you to join me for a new series: conversations with my colleagues, the professionals who lead – as CEOs, executive directors, and regional directors – our member organizations. We’ll be talking about what brought them to this work, how they practice building a vibrant Jewish community, how they think about their communities in a broader ecosystem, and how they understand the notion of “community.” 

We’ll be kicking off this series with Dalit Ballen Horn, who began as the new executive director of The Vilna Shul this past year. In the coming weeks I’ll sit down with Lital Carmel of the Israeli-American Council of Boston, and with Ari Fertig of the New England Jewish Labor Committee. We’ll be announcing more conversations in the months ahead (with over 40 members, some half of whom have regional executives, it will take time to get to everyone).  

The focus of these conversations won’t be “politics” – though some may include the topic. What they will be are conversations about who we are in all of our parts. We hope that they will be illuminating to our appreciation of these leaders and their communities. And we hope they will deepen our understanding, as well as that of our civic partners, about who and what we mean when we talk about the organized Jewish community in Greater Boston.   

I hope you’ll join us on this journey. 

Shabbat Shalom,

Jeremy