Tag Archives: Israel

JCRC to Lead MA Municipal Leaders on Study Tour of Israel

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 7, 2018
Contact: Shira Burns
gro.n1544410695otsob1544410695crcj@1544410695snrub1544410695s1544410695
(617) 457-8673

JCRC to Lead MA Municipal Leaders on Study Tour of Israel
Massachusetts Community Leaders to Explore Economic Ties to Region

(BOSTON) – The Jewish Community Relations Council (JCRC) of Greater Boston continues its long history of leading Massachusetts community leaders on a study tour of Israel, this month providing MA municipal leaders with an in-depth look into the economic, political, and security challenges and successes facing Israeli society.

From December 7-15, Massachusetts municipal leaders will travel throughout Israel, learning from government officials and religious, academic, media, and business leaders.

“This trip will allow Massachusetts leaders to deepen their understanding of Israel's politics and culture, and examine some of the economic ties that bring Israel and Massachusetts together,” said Jeremy Burton, Executive Director of JCRC of Greater Boston. “The best way to deepen the MA/Israel connection is through a mutual understanding of our common interests—participants will gain firsthand knowledge about how they can strengthen relationships with their Israeli counterparts."

The Massachusetts municipal leaders will:

  • Meet with government officials, municipal leaders, and other influential leaders from all sectors of Israeli and Palestinian society, developing city to city connections and sharing best practices in addressing current municipal issues
  • Visit Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, border regions, and the Palestinian Areas.
    Discover the growing economic and cultural ties between Israel and Massachusetts
  • Gain new perspectives on modern day Israel
  • Develop a nuanced understanding of the complex political and security challenges facing Israel
  • Encounter Israel’s innovative economy, including its booming research, development, and tech sector.

The trip is being paid with a grant from the nonprofit Combined Jewish Philanthropies of Greater Boston. Participants pay a registration fee for the trip from their own funds.

Following are the participants in the 2018 Municipal Study Tour of Israel:

Councilor Andrea Campbell (Trip Chair), Boston Councilor Kim Janey, Boston
Councilor Mark Ciommo, Boston Fredie Kay, JCRC Board Member
Marjorie Ross Decter – JCRC Board Member Mayor Nicole LaChapelle, Easthampton
Councilor Edward Flynn, Boston Councilor Nina Liang, Quincy
Select Board Member Heather Hamilton, Brookline Chief of Staff Elizabeth Pimentel, Office of Andrea Campbell
Councilor Katrina Huff-Larmond, Randolph Alderman Mike Zwirko, Melrose
Councilor Justin Hurst, Springfield

About the Jewish Community Relations Council
JCRC defines and advances the values, interests, and priorities of the organized Jewish community of Greater Boston in the public square. Visit us at www.jcrcboston.org.

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JCRC Dismayed by Elimination of Funds for Israeli-Palestinian Co-existence

JCRC is strongly opposed to the recent Trump Administration decision to eliminate USAID funding for projects in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. We are particularly disturbed by the Administration’s decision to cut off funding for co-existence programs for Israelis and Palestinians. The suspension of all USAID support will harm the chances for peaceful reconciliation between Israelis and Palestinians, and will only serve to punish the Palestinian people for the failures of their leadership and create an opportunity for extremist groups to gain strength in the Palestinian Territories.

Israeli-Palestinian co-existence programs are the best long-term strategy for achieving peace and the two-state solution. The support of co-existence programs allows the United States to exert its global influence to create change that speaks to our deepest values of justice, dignity, and peace. JCRC calls on the Trump Administration to reverse this decision, and to rethink how United States aid can be used to encourage rather than discourage peace for Israelis and Palestinians.

Statement from the National Network of JCRCs Expressing Disappointment on Passage of Israel’s Nation-State Bill

New York, NY – The Jewish Council for Public Affairs (JCPA) expresses its profound disappointment in the Knesset passage into law of the Nation-State. We are concerned that this new law undermines Israel’s vibrant democracy comprised of diverse religious and ethnic groups.

JCPA has worked tirelessly to affirm the central value of Jewish unity and the strong bonds that connect us to one another and to the State of Israel. However, over the past year we have become increasingly concerned about strains in the Israeli-Diaspora relationship, which this law further exacerbates.

“We are dismayed at this latest undermining of the Israeli-Diaspora relationship.” stated Cheryl Fishbein, JCPA Board Chair. “It is not Israeli democracy’s finest hour.”

“We are still assessing the implications of the legislation,” stated David Bernstein, JCPA President and CEO. “We urge the government to ensure that the law does not permit discriminatory conduct.”

JCPA urges the government to modify the law so that it aligns with the country’s strong value of equal rights for all Israelis and does not risk damaging the country’s reputation.

Israeli & Palestinian Women Leading the Charge for Peace

I spent last week in Jerusalem, Bethlehem, and Ramallah as a facilitator for Encounter, following my experience as a participant last year. This time, my role was to support other American Jewish leaders who were there to listen and learn from Palestinians about their lives and experiences. I also had the opportunity to spend a few days touring in Jerusalem, with the ground partners we work with on our civic leader study tours, exploring new (to us) ways to engage.

Three “moments” that I would not have imagined possible only a few years ago have stuck with me as I returned home. They feature extraordinary women representing vastly different communities, but pursuing common goals with relentless determination and unimaginable courage.

With JCRC’s ground partners on Mount Zion, just outside the Old City walls, at the Jerusalem Intercultural Center, I learn about current efforts by Palestinian Jerusalemite women (the vast majority of whom are not citizens of Israel) to organize and agitate for basic municipal services. Since they refuse to recognize Israeli sovereignty, this community has been engaging in a 50-year-long boycott of municipal elections. One result has been their lack of representation at City Hall, leading to, among other things, chronic problems with services like street-light repair and garbage pickup. For decades, these issues were taken up by the clan leaders, the men in their communities – to little effect. But in recent years, the women have taken matters into their own hands, organizing, and even building coalitions with Orthodox and secular women in Jewish communities of the city. Their efforts are bearing fruit, including increases in budgets for services that are improving the quality of life  in their communities. Women, we are told, are getting the job done.

In Geula, a Haredi neighborhood of Jerusalem – a place I knew well when I was a black-hat yeshiva student living in that city in the 1980’s – a Hasidic woman leads us on a professional walking tour. She tells us about her own journey from 18-year-old married mother to a later-in-life college degree and profession. She engages us in an open and profoundly candid conversation – one I would never have imagined having with a woman from this community even 10 years ago – about social change and social issues in her community; women’s health education including birth control, LGBT issues, debates over higher education, etc. My friend asks her if she will have any issues walking on the streets with obviously outsider men (let alone any man other than her husband). “Things are changing. My neighbors understand the importance of what I am doing. This corner is fine,” she replies.

Then in Bethlehem, now having joined the Encounter group, I meet a Muslim woman who is involved in Women Wage Peace – a group of Israeli and Palestinian women working through non-violent means to build grassroots pressure on the political leadership in support of peace. This woman (names are protected because not all the people I met were on the record) tells us about her own journey and her determined efforts to teach her neighbors and youth in her community to see The Other – the Israeli, the Jew – as fully human, and to appreciate the feelings they have, that are common to us all.

She has brought her teenage son with her to this meeting with American Jewish leaders. He sits quietly next to her. At one point, as she tells her story, she talks about the first intifada in the 1980’s, when she was in college and I was a post-high school yeshiva student just down the road in Jerusalem. She did what all her classmates did: threw stones at the Jews. Jews like me, a mile away, I think to myself. And, as she tells this story, she reaches out and gently places her left hand on her son’s knee; only for a moment, while talking about her own violent past. And she doesn’t touch him again for the hour we are together.

I feel the message in that moment and in this boy’s presence in the room: She’s telling this story as a mistake she prays he does not repeat. She’s brought him here to see that her choice, to pursue non-violence as a practice, is a better one, and one that opens up doors of access to her, that brings her voice and vision before us visitors. It is a choice that needs validation and support. And over our time in Palestinian areas, we hear other activists who practice non-violence tell us that they need “wins.” Victories to show their neighbors that their approach works, that violence is not the path to a better future.

I come away appreciating that change is possible and continuing to happen. But that change never happens on its own. It takes bold vision and profound courage. And it needs our support; to amplify the visibility of activists, to celebrate and give strength to those pursuing non-violent social change. I’m proud that Women Wage Peace is one of the initial participants in the Boston Partners for Peace, our effort to amplify and connect with changemakers on the ground who are bridging the Israeli and Palestinian communities and paving the way to a better future.

We can have an impact in supporting the future of this place that continues to evolve before our eyes – only if we take the time to listen, to learn, to be inspired. But we must also act now, for we know that this possibility can be fleeting, and nothing is guaranteed to last forever. The question I ask myself is: What will these neighborhoods and communities will look like in another ten years, and how can our community be a part of cementing their progress long into the future?

Shabbat Shalom,

Jeremy 

The Israel conversation we’re striving for…

At the risk of repeating a tired trope, I will point out that there is virtually no matter on which the Jewish community is united in our analysis and opinions. That is arguably most true with regard to our concerns for the future of the State of Israel. And there is probably no subject that has invited more angst-ridden pieces in recent Jewish discourse than the current state of the relationship between Israeli and American Jews – the two largest Jewish centers of population in the world. We are seen, increasingly, as akin to Mars and Venus; talking past each other in our religious, social, cultural, and political perspectives.

In the Boston Jewish community, we treasure a range of thought and voices in our community on these matters. We seek to foster respectful discussion; not to achieve agreement amongst us but rather, to build understanding and mutual regard across our diversity.

This is why we at JCRC are proud that our Council – 42 organizations and growing – is amongst the most ideologically diverse deliberative bodies in American Jewish life today. And it is why CJP has invested in the CommUNITY Dialogue on Israel over the past two years. We strive for a rich and vibrant conversation about Israel. We work toward the ability to act together where there is consensus – such as working toward the two-state peace that we believe is essential for Israel’s future – and to act in accordance with our individual viewpoints where there is not.

Among the panoply of voices essential to our collective conversation about Israel is that of Israelis living both here and in Israel, as well as the representatives of the government of the State of Israel. Though we - in parts or in whole – may not always agree with any particular government, we always appreciate its role as the democratically elected leadership and representation of the will of Israel’s majority.

It is therefore our great honor – as JCRC and as the organized Jewish community of Boston – to host the State of Israel’s highest representative to the United States, His Excellency Ambassador Ron Dermer, for the 15th annual Connie Spear Birnbaum Memorial Lecture on Monday May 7th, 7:30pm at Temple Reyim in Newton. This lecture is appropriately named for a woman who, upon her untimely passing from breast cancer at age 48, became a symbol of Jewish unity and the inspiration for an annual program which is intended to gather individuals from across the ideological and religious spectrum of Jewish life.

Ambassador Dermer will address the challenges facing Israel today; a timely topic in this season when we join with Israel in celebrating the 70th anniversary of the re-establishment of the state of the Jewish people in its modern form.

We look forward to hearing from the Ambassador, to him addressing our questions, and to his informing and enriching our conversation as we continue to work together as a diverse and yet unified community.

The event is free. Pre-registration is required. I hope you will join us.

Shabbat Shalom,

Jeremy

JCRC Statement on Events Along Gaza Border

We see the events along the Gaza-Israel border this weekend as the continuation of one of the great tragedies of our time. This is a situation where many are at fault, leaving individuals in impossible situations with impossible choices.

It is a tragedy for the people of Gaza that, 12 years after the complete withdrawal of Israel from the Gaza Strip, they live under such difficult conditions. It is a tragedy for the Palestinians that Gaza was taken over by Hamas, an internationally designated terrorist organization that rules in a brutal dictatorship. It is a tragedy that Hamas has chosen to direct its resources to the building of tunnels and rockets, rather than building hospitals, schools, housing, and factories that would create prosperity and opportunity for the Palestinian people. It is a tragedy that, by squandering the opportunity to build a better future for the Palestinian people, Hamas has forced Israel and Egypt to secure their own borders with a blockade to prevent the further weaponization of Gaza.

It is a tragedy that the Palestinian people of Gaza have no recourse against their leaders, living without elections or even the ability to protest those in power openly on pain of death. It is a tragedy that they are deceived by their own leaders with the unrealistic promise of a destructive victory over the State of Israel – a victory that will never come. It is a tragedy that their own government chooses to use them as human shields, perpetuating their suffering for nefarious self-interest.

It is a tragedy that the Israeli people look at Gaza and see the end of a dream; to live in peace with their neighbors. It is a tragedy that Israelis living near the border are terrorized by threats coming from tunnels under their homes and rockets over their schools. It is a tragedy that when Israelis do what any other nation in the world would do – protect their border from being overrun – that they endure a condemnation that no other nation would receive. It is a tragedy that Israelis experience this singling out as a further example of an isolation, their status as “the Jew amongst the nations,” with only themselves to protect their inalienable rights to live in security.

It is a tragedy because this weekend, young men and women of the Israel Defense Forces stared down the sights of their rifles and learned violence at a time when they should have been at home with their families celebrating freedom at the Passover table. It is a tragedy because Palestinians need some way to express their frustrations  at Israel and at their own government after years of wasted opportunities to build a better life for the people of Gaza. Instead they experienced more manipulation, and more loss.

We see this weekend as the continuation of a tragedy that has not brought the people of Israel and Gaza any closer to a future of peace and hope for all of their children. As the Boston Jewish community continues to celebrate the Passover holiday this week, we are mindful of the lessons learned at our seders, that we do not rejoice over the tragedy of others and we are ever hopeful for peace and stability for all people.

Our Annual Israel Winter Study Tour

A short while ago, I arrived in Israel. Joined by our director of Israel Engagement, Eli Cohn-Postell, and two of our board members, Alex Goldstein and Leah Robbins, I am privileged to be leading our annual winter study tour for Massachusetts legislators.

Two Massachusetts Senators - Joseph Boncore and Patrick O’Connor - and eleven Representatives - Linda Dean Campbell, Evandro Carvalho, Gerard Cassidy, Kenneth Gordon, Danielle Gregoire, David Muradian, Jerald Parisella, Jeffrey Sanchez, Alan Silvia, Chynah Tyler and RoseLee Vincent - will be spending the next nine days experiencing the region and learning about the challenges and hopes of this place that is so near and dear to all of us.

I’ve said it before, but with six consecutive December trips for public officials (some one-third of the current sitting members of the Massachusetts legislature have come with us during this period!) and several other delegations in between, one might think that I’d get a bit jaded. Hardly! Every trip is a unique experience for me, on three levels:

First is that, with each group, I get to experience this place I care so deeply about through fresh eyes. It’s amazing to encounter Israel and my own deep connection to our roots through the lens of someone who is seeing it for the first time. And, I get to witness as our participants fall in love with the leaders and activists who’ve inspired and energized me for years.

Second, I am confident that - as on every trip - this week, I will meet at least one interesting person here for the first time. Maybe he will excite me or, just as likely, she will challenge my thinking and understanding. But one way or another, I’ll come away with another layer, another story, another example of how – after thirty-one years since I first lived here and after visiting countless times since – I still have so much to learn about this place.

Finally, while every trip examines long-existing challenges and the layers of this region, each also presents the opportunity to come face-to-face with a unique moment and get a fresh perspective on how people here are grappling with and talking about the latest developments. This week, it goes without saying, that news is Jerusalem and the United States government’s view of this most ancient city and Israel’s capital.

Those “in the news” moments will inevitably bring us back to the enduring conversations we’ve been having for years. How do different people and stakeholders define “Jerusalem?” What does this place mean to us, and to others? How is Jerusalem an issue and where does it sit relative to other matters that come up as part of the discussion about achieving peace and a two-state solution for Israelis and Palestinians?

Which is to say that for folks who are here for the first time and challenging their understanding of this place in a new way, the conversation will transcend the current moment and news cycle. We will begin a broader conversation that will hopefully be an enduring one, as they continue to follow events and deepen their understanding in six months or six years.

So yes, it has been JCRC’s incredible privilege to bring so many members of the Massachusetts legislature - as well as dozens of clergy and other civic leaders - to Israel over the years. I am profoundly grateful to have the opportunity and the donor support that allows us to be here. This experience never fails to energize and inspire me. It will, I am confident, renew and strengthen my own commitment to all that we do back home in Boston to engage with Israel and to work in support of those here whose hopes and aspirations we share - for two people, Israelis and Palestinians, living in peace in two states sharing one homeland.

I hope over the coming weeks you’ll follow our journey on social media and I look forward to sharing more about our impressions when we return.

Shabbat shalom,

Jeremy

Statement from JCRC of Greater Boston Regarding the Status of Jerusalem

President Trump announced today that the United States government recognizes Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. It has long been JCRC’s view that the failure by the nations of the world, including the United States, to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel is a historic injustice. Since 1949, when Israel established its capital in those parts of West Jerusalem under its sovereignty, the nations of the world have refused to recognize it. This refusal has singled out Israel amongst all nations, denying Israel the right that every other sovereign nation has to determine the location of its own capital within its sovereign territory. JCRC welcomes progress towards removing this injustice.

And yet, at this moment of pride and joy for so much of our community, we must also acknowledge that many in our community have raised questions and concerns about the timing of this announcement. We support a two-state solution, directly negotiated by the Israelis and Palestinians. We are concerned that today’s action could potentially damage the prospects for achieving — and diminish the ability of the United States to act effectively as a facilitator of — the peace that we all desire. The path to peace is challenging. We have no crystal ball that tells us which steps complicate or smooth the way forward.

We hope that Israeli and Palestinian leaders will act in the best interest of their people and take meaningful steps to ease tensions and advance the cause of peace. We reaffirm our own commitment to support efforts that hasten the realization of peace, security, and prosperity for both Israelis and Palestinians.